Leonard, H.L. - Original 14' Hunt Model Salmon Rod

For sale here we have a very rare rod. An original H.L. Leonard "Hunt" Salmon rod. The rod is 14' with four sections and two tips. The rod is in excellent condition considering its age though it does have some bag-burn and marks in the varnish throughout. There are no apparent repairs. One or two of the silk wraps may be replacements but generally all of the wraps appear age-appropriate. All sections appear to be their original length with sets in the mip and tip sections. 

The rod features a beautiful darkly-stained cane finish and deeply oxidized fittings with golden wraps and full intermediates. Reverse, English-style guides. Nickel silver winding check. The foregrip is 8 1/4" with the rear grip being 7 1/2" including the rubber button. The cork appears to have perhaps been cleaned and remains in excellent condition free of ridging or other defects though the rubber butt cap displays some minor cracking. The locking reel seat remains in fine condition with some loss of oxidation. The ferrules are size 25/64, 18/64, and 12/64. Due to the age and significance of this rod, it was not assembled. The rod weighs 20.4 oz. Includes original heavy canvas bag that houses all the sections as well as a smaller bag that holds the second mid and two tip sections. 

All of the markings and other features indicate this is one of the original Hunt models offered from Leonard. Richard Carley Hunt requested Leonard to make him a rod some time in the 1920's to his unique specifications. It featured stained bamboo sections as well as oxidized fittings. The first mention we can find of a "Hunt" model is in the 1953 William Mills & Son catalog. Interestingly this rod bears a much earlier stamping:

H.L. LEONARD
ROD
LEONARD & MILLS CO.
MAKERS

This stamping was used from the 1890's up until the early to mid-1920's indicating this rod was made only shortly after Mr. Hunt approached Leonard. This is perhaps the earliest example of the "Hunt" model rod. Rumor has it that the rod could be Hunt's personal salmon rod although no genuine provenance is available to support that statement.